Signs For Lost Children by Sarah Moss

This review comes with a hint of struggle; because I’ve just finished a brilliant book and it’s playing on my mind. Also, Signs For Lost Children, while of the usual Moss high-quality, didn’t engage me in the same way Tidal Zone, Bodies of Light or Night Walking did. “Only weeks into their marriage a young couple embark on a six-month period of separation. Tom Cavendish goes to Japan to build lighthouses and his wife Ally, ………

Review: Dune by Frank Herbert

I’ve tried to read Dune before. It was a ‘started-but-couldn’t-finish’ during my Books Before 30 years (technically a break from the rules, but it was killing my desire to read). I’m not sure what made me want to read it again, a friend mentioned reading it, a sudden desire to fall into an epic sci-fi, perhaps both. Dune by Frank Herbert was an intricate reading experience, a novel I’m glad I’ve read but didn’t entirely enjoy ………

Review: Take Courage: Anne Brontë and the Art of Life by Samantha Ellis

As I’ve mentioned previously, before Anne, Emily was my favourite Brontë. Wuthering Heights over Jane Eyre, always. I didn’t even come to read Anne’s books until I decided I wanted to read all the Brontë novels. How misinformed I was! Anne’s writing was beyond what I was expecting from the other “less talented” Brontë sister. Where Emily and Charlotte’s hard romance enforced my young, teenage-minded version of love, Anne gave me reality. “Anne Brontë is the forgotten ………

2016; A Reading Year In Review

HAPPY NEW YEAR! And welcome to my 6th year of blogging. 2016 had a bit of a hit in terms of blogging and reading volume, but I’m hoping to rectify this in 2017. Nevertheless, I’ve encountered some brilliant books. 2016 80 books read, 26 less than in 2015. 34 5* books. 2 more than 2015. I’m always surprised when this number increases, but perhaps I am better at selecting books that challenge and entertain me. ………