Evil Splinter; ‘The Rats’ by James Herbert [1974]

Generally, I am not one for Horror stories – I have this marvellous ability to scare the crap out of myself. I only decided to read The Rats by James Herbert, because Twitter told me he had died. For millions of years man and rats had been natural enemies. But now for the first time – suddenly, shockingly, horribly – the balance of power had shifted and the rats began to prey on the human ………

Room 101; ‘Nineteen Eighty-Four’ by George Orwell [1948]

Dystopian fiction; either it is something prevalent beyond the time in which it is set, or it is too limited, out of touch, or ridiculous, and is forgotten. Dystopians are such, as a comment on society and its failings, that to be significant beyond the period in which it is written is to reflect how politics never really changes. Doctrines alter, people rebel; inherently we will all end concluding Politics and Government have run us into ………

Styliste de Mode; ‘Grace: A Memoir’ by Grace Coddington [2012]

Whenever I look at something pretty it reminds me I really need to redesign this blog; which then reminds me I lack a creative eye, which then makes me sad. Grace Coddington, Creative Director at American Vogue, is secretly talented; secretly in that she does not boast or seek the limelight. Thus, I both admire and envy her. I cannot say why, but I was not expecting her to have lived the life she had, ………

Death Becomes Her; ‘Rebecca’ by Daphne du Maurier [1938]

After a not so noticeable hiatus, I have returned. My life plans unfolded recently so, I opted to take a break from writing for a week and try and catch up with everyone I have missed over the past two months. Welcome to the end of finance-Alice and to the beginning of writer-Alice. Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier was surprisingly addictive, for about two thirds of it anyway. It got to a point where I ………