Literary Life: June in Review

My copy of Landline by Rainbow Rowell and How to Built a Girl by Caitlin Moran have arrived on my Kindle today. I’m not usually one for YA, but right now I have reverted to fifteen year old Alice (pre-discovery of misery and rock-opera) and I am incredibly excited. Happy publication day to them!

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My friends at work got me this, which officially makes them them best people to work with ever! The ‘Do Not Contact’ is a long story, and surprisingly is not to do with my temperament.

I hit the 50 books read mark this month, I don’t think I’ve ever read this much in the first six month of year before.

Currently Reading:

 The Marriage Plot by Jeffrey Eugenides

Unfinished:

None!

Read:

  1. Girl Seven by Hanna Jameson
  2. The Secret History by Donna Tartt
  3. The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith
  4. They Do It with Mirrors by Agatha Christie
  5. All the Birds, Singing by Evie Wyld
  6. The Vacationers by Emma Straub
  7. Precious Thing by Colette McBeth

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Poetry Discovered:

The Lesson by Maya Angelou
A Draught of Sunshine by John Keats
I’m Nobody! Who are you? by Emily Dickenson

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In other news:

 Going to Latitude? They have a Literary Arena. Laura Bates, Naomi Wood, Jon Ronson and Shami Chakrabarti are a few of the people attending.

The Port Eliot Festival is also on – Viv Albertine will be there!

How was your June?

 

13 thoughts on “Literary Life: June in Review

  1. I hope you have a good time reading it.

    I fail at keeping up with blogs. Did not know you have a job now, I hope it is going well. 🙂

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  2. Awww. That is such a nice note from your work friends. You’ve had a good reading month. It’s hard to believe the year is half over already! I don’t keep stats on my reading because it would be too disappointing. 🙂 University starts for me again next week, so reading for myself and blogging will take a back seat for a while. I hope you’re liking The Marriage Plot. It seemed to divide people – as a lit major I could relate to it quite well, but I found it hard to read about Leonard. He broke my heart because his character is a bit too close to my reality. Oh well. Fiction can do that to you.

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  3. I’ll be wrapping up my June on my blog this coming Sunday, but all in all, it was a good one, can’t complain. I’m also reading a Rainbow Rowell book, Eleanor & Park and enjoying it so far. I’ll let you know what I think of the ending later.

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  4. My June was great! Busy but great! I got to see an unprecedented number of my relatives at the same time (sister got married), and I discovered a new and better way to read my university library’s ebooks. Wins all around.

    I am SO JEALOUS about Landline. I really want to read it but also am worried I won’t like it (it’s more high-concept than her past books). I’m thinking about going over to B&N today and reading the first third or so of it in the store to figure out if I want to buy it.

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    1. Yay excellent Junes!

      I’ve read two chapters of Landline, and already I’m not sure if I like it. Although, for some reasons I thought it was set in the 90s, no idea why. Let me know if you buy it or not!

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  5. What an awesome gift, and I echo Violet, a nice note, too. Rowell’s work sort of transcends YA, don’t you think? 🙂 Well done on hitting 50, that’s pretty great given that we’re only halfway through the year. My June was okay, a fair number of books, and better than it has been.

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    1. It was so sweet, made for a lovely Wednesday.

      I think now she has two novels firmly in YA and two outside of that I suppose she does transcend YA a little, but her writing style makes me forget she also writes for adults. I don’t mean that in a nasty way, just that she has a niche.

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