The Eleventh Letter by Tom Tomaszewski

The Eleventh Letter by Tom Tomaszewski

Ghost, psychotherapy, snow storms, Italy, what more could entice me to read? The Eleventh Letter by Tom Tomaszewski is an inception like dive from 2010 to 1986, when the protagonist Chris revisits an old case that appears to have never stopped haunting him.

The Eleventh Letter by Tom TomaszewskiChris Katiwa, a Harley Street psychotherapist, finds himself trapped in his office by heavy snow. When a beautiful, enigmatic woman asks to take shelter with him, he finds himself drawn to her charisma. Discovering tapes concerning a murder trial from the 1980s, Chris and his mysterious guest listen to voices from the past as the night draws in and darkness falls.

Chris begins to wonder if the woman he once tried to defend is as innocent as he had thought. Was she involved in the Pisa killings, or were they work of the savage serial killer that became known as the Wolfman? The Eleventh Letter is a ghostly, Lynchian tale that explores love and lies, murder and madness. GoodReads.

My first impression on reading this book was that it would make a brilliant film, especially in the way the novel first sets out the interviews with Louise. It’s mostly dialogue, and I had trouble remembering to read the rest of the text that indicated the tone or intonation of what the characters were saying.

However, the further the novel dives into the mystery or Louise, Kate and John. The more Chris’s retelling becomes mixed with the past, and you’re not entirely sure who is who and what memories is whom’s, or even what version of Chris (old or young) is in what element of the story.

The Eleventh Letter is a very clever book, well thought out and intricate, making memories into ghosts and ghosts into memories. It reminded me of Dickens, Poe, Kafka, Meredith Kercher’s murder, and poetry all at once. And that trauma has a way of finding it’s way out, no matter how hard you try and forget it.

The quality of writing didn’t always match the brilliance of what the author was saying. However, once you get into the swing of the novel you should find this irritation falls aside in favour of working out the ending, who is real and who is a ghost – and it’s well worth it for that.

Thank you to Dodo Ink who sent me this book in exchange for an honest review.

Review: Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

Hype, it’s a problematic beast. It is the reason I still haven’t read Slumdog Millionaire, concerned it won’t live up to my expectations. I would argue that only 10% of the time I am likely to enjoy a book everyone is raving about; unless of course I read it prior to, or without knowledge of, the hype, then the odds go up in favour of enjoyment.

ggOn a warm summer morning in North Carthage, Missouri, it is Nick and Amy Dunne’s fifth wedding anniversary. Presents are being wrapped and reservations are being made when Nick’s clever and beautiful wife disappears from their rented McMansion on the Mississippi River. Husband-of-the-Year Nick isn’t doing himself any favors with cringe-worthy daydreams about the slope and shape of his wife’s head, but passages from Amy’s diary reveal the alpha-girl perfectionist could have put anyone dangerously on edge. Under mounting pressure from the police and the media–as well as Amy’s fiercely doting parents–the town golden boy parades an endless series of lies, deceits, and inappropriate behavior. Nick is oddly evasive, and he’s definitely bitter–but is he really a killer?

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The Silent Wife by A.S.A. Harrison

Some may call this reclusive or anti-social, but I spent the whole weekend alone reading. It was marvellous! I have not felt this recharged in a long time.

First devoured was The Silent Wife by A.S.A. Harrison:

tswA chilling psychological thriller portraying the disintegration of a relationship down to the deadliest point when murdering your husband suddenly makes perfect sense.

Todd Gilbert and Jodi Brett are in a bad place in their relationship. They’ve been together for twenty-eight years, and with no children to worry about there has been little to disrupt their affluent Chicago lifestyle. But there has also been little to hold it together, and beneath the surface lie ever-widening cracks. HE is a committed cheater. SHE lives and breathes denial. HE exists in dual worlds. SHE likes to settle scores. HE decides to play for keeps. SHE has nothing left to lose. When it becomes clear that their precarious world could disintegrate at any moment, Jodi knows she stands to lose everything. It’s only now she will discover just how much she’s truly capable of…Synopsis from Headline.co.uk

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